Welcome to D3.js visualisations of UK House of Commons votes on Brexit options

How to use

The pages linked to above are D3.js force directed layouts - with click and drag enabled.

Party colours as follows (grey is for those who do not vote - by abstentionist policy - in case of Sinn Féin - or by position - the Speakers) :-

To find a specific MP use your browser's search function. On a desktop/laptop: Ctrl+F (aka Cmd + F on a Mac) and type the name - that finds it and, for me using Firefox, highlights it. On mobile: Menu > Find in page (on mobile Chrome it centred graph on the name but did not highlight it).

You can get the kind of layout seen in the 1st of the three images below without any clicking or dragging.

Or you can click and drag the yellow nodes representing the various Brexit options and perhaps get something similar to the 2nd and 3rd of the three images below.

Diagram showing most Conservatives MPs in a clump at one end and Labour and other parties in a clump at the other end - like two ends of a barbell. Conservative end has group supporting No Deal and Preferential arrangements only and a group supporting those options plus the government deal labelled 'MV circa 3'. The opposition end has Labour MPs in the centre connected to, that is supporting Labour plans, Customs Union, Common Market, a confirmatory public vote and Revocation safety mechanism (if 2 days away from No Deal). The non Labour opposition numbers are largely concentrated at that end between the confirmatory public vote option and the Revocation safety mechanism. The two ends are connected - like a barbell handle by a small but noticeable number of Conservative MPs who voted for the Customs Union and Common Market options. There is no great mass of Conservative MPs willing to put their plans to a public vote at this stage. The DUP cluster around the preferential arrangements option. Diagram showing that in the 1st of April indicative votes the SNP and a group of Labour MPs - who were not previously voting for the Common Market option - supported it. The Conservative groupings around No Deal and the Conservative/DUP grouping seem unchanged - with a few more Conservatives appearing in the middle voting for the Common market option.

The above image from 1st April - whereas the image below is from the votes up & including vote 29th March. The group of the SNP and Labour MPs supporting the Common Market option is the major change.

Diagram showing most Conservatives MPs on the right and Labour and other parties to the left. The opposition end has Labour MPs in the centre connected to, that is supporting Labour plans, Customs Union, Common Market, a confirmatory public vote and Revocation safety mechanism (if 2 days away from No Deal). They form several clusters - a relatively small cluster support Labour plans, Customs Union and Common Market only. The The non Labour opposition numbers are largely concentrated at that end between the confirmatory public vote option and the Revocation safety mechanism. The two ends are connected - like a barbell handle by a small but noticeable number of Conservative MPs who voted for the Customs Union and Common Market options - with a similar minority supporting either only Labour plans alone or with a Customs Union. Most Labour MPs however are flexible if a customs union is involved - the most flexible supported: Public Vote, Revocation safety mechanism, Customs Union, Common Market and as expected Labour plans - that but without the revocation safety mechanism was another popular cluster. The Conservatives largely congregate around the government deal or that plus No Deal and prereferential arrangements. The voters for EFTA are most Conservative and few in number but they are diverse - the votes coming not only from those supporting No Deal and/or the government deal but also from the few in the Conservative middle ground who will support a Customs Union and/or Common Market, There is no great mass of Conservative MPs willing to put their plans to a public vote at this stage.